Author Archives: cviorel - Page 5

Google Wave

The guys behind the Google Maps are working on a tool for communication and collaboration on the web. It’s called Google Wave and it’s planned for release later this year. The nice thing is that will be open source’d and you can allready use their API to start building your stuff.
You can watch the video from the Google I/O where they unveiled the project.

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_UyVmITiYQ

Android applications running on Ubuntu

500px-android-logosvg Canonical will develop an environment wich will allow Andoid applications to run on Ubuntu. Source.
Also, HP considers dropping Windows for Android in netbooks. Source.

Random crash of the X server in Jaunty

I experienced a lot of random X server crashes using the proprietary driver for the NVIDIA graphic card on my Thinkpad T61 running Ubuntu 9.04 x86 with Compiz activated.
I managed to fix the problem by installing the lastest NVIDIA driver. I wrote a little script to automate the process and save time. I recommend you to run this in command line mode. Here it is:

Custom usplash resolution in Ubuntu

Recently I made a clean install of Ubuntu 9.04 on my Thinkpad T61.
I configured the figerprint, the accelerometer is reporting correct values.
I did not like the default resolution at boot. So I created a custom usplash.conf file:

I should contain these lines:

The next step was to update the “initial RAM disk”, that is used when the system boots up:

Next, I modified my /boot/grub/menu.lst file.
I added as a parameter for the current kernel the value vga=872:

Nice and clean!

Auto update for Debian/Ubuntu

I use the following script to automatically update my Ubuntu box.
I don’t recommend using this on your production servers!

Note that there are some dangers regarding automatic updates. You can read more about it here.

No LFE (Low-Frequency Effects) in Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope)

There is a new catch if you want to enable 5.1 surround sound in Ubuntu 9.04. First you need to follow the same steps like you did for Hardy Heron. There is an old post I wrote about it.
In this new version of PulseAudio they don’t synthesize an LFE signal anymore by default.
They introduced this new option called disable-lfe-remixing.

When upmixing or downmixing ignore LFE channels. When this option is on the output LFE channel will only get a signal when an input LFE channel is available as well. If no input LFE channel is available the output LFE channel will always be 0. If no output LFE channel is available the signal on the input LFE channel will be ignored. Defaults to “on”.

The solution to get you bass back is to set this option to no.
As a result, here are the steps you need to take:

Uncomment the line containing:

and replace '2' with '6' (if you have a 7.1 card, replace '2' with '8').
Next, set disable-lfe-remixing option to no

Restart your computer and you’re in business.
NOTE: Documentation for this article is taken from here and here.

Apply themes to GTK apps running as root

When you install custom GTK themes, applications running as root will still look ugly.
To make your current installed themes available to the root account as well, you just need to run these in your terminal:

Enjoy!

Songbird: glibc 2.8 detects invalid free() pointer

Sometimes I use Songbird to listen to my music files or internet radio. On some systems running Ubuntu 8.10 it does not run. The error is a known bug reported by some people.
The resolution is simple. Just remove libvisual-0.4-plugins.

Enjoy your music!

Bash script to retrieve info about current playing track on ARM.FM

I am a big fan of ARM.FM.
Their playlist contains the freshest tracks in the dance music.
I wanted to keep track of the tunes I like the most, so I made a little script to update a file on my desktop with the name of the track currently playing.
Here is the script, you may use and/or modify it as you please.

Install Django on Ubuntu 8.10

Django is a high-level Python Web framework that encourages rapid development and clean, pragmatic design.
To install it on your Ubuntu, follow the next steps:

1. Install python (if you have it installed, skip this step)

2. Download the tarball from the Django Project website. You can download this file to your home directory.

3. Now we can just move this entire package to somewhere logical. You can move it anywhere you like, but remember to modify the links accordingly. I use /usr/local/lib/.

4. Link to it from the Python site-packages directory, and create a link to the django-admin.py executable.

5. Test it by changing to your home directory and running django-admin!

You should see this:

6. Happy programming!

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